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Unfinished Domestic Hardwood Flooring

 

The wood flooring samples pictured on this site are only a sampling of the material we carry, or that is available to us. 

American Cherry Common

American Cherry Common

Heartwood is light to dark reddish brown; sapwood is light brown to pale with a light pinkish tone. Some flooring manufactures steam lumber to bleed the darker heartwood color into the sapwood, resulting in a more uniform color. Grain: Fine, frequently wavy, uniform texture. Variations Within Species and Grades: Significant color variations between boards in common grades.

American Cherry Charactermark

American Cherry Charactermark

Heartwood is light to dark reddish brown; sapwood is light brown to pale with a light pinkish tone. Some flooring manufactures steam lumber to bleed the darker heartwood color into the sapwood, resulting in a more uniform color. Grain: Fine, frequently wavy, uniform texture. Variations Within Species and Grades: Significant color variations between boards in common grades.

American Cherry Select & Better

American Cherry Select & Better

Heartwood is light to dark reddish brown; sapwood is light brown to pale with a light pinkish tone. Some flooring manufactures steam lumber to bleed the darker heartwood color into the sapwood, resulting in a more uniform color. Grain: Fine, frequently wavy, uniform texture. Variations Within Species and Grades: Significant color variations between boards in common grades.

American Cherry Rift & Quartered

American Cherry Rift & Quartered

Heartwood is light to dark reddish brown; sapwood is light brown to pale with a light pinkish tone. Some flooring manufactures steam lumber to bleed the darker heartwood color into the sapwood, resulting in a more uniform color. Grain: Fine, frequently wavy, uniform texture. Variations Within Species and Grades: Significant color variations between boards in common grades.

Ash Common

Ash Common

Heartwood is light tan to dark brown; sapwood is cream y white. Similar in appearance to white oak, but frequently more yellow. Grain: Bold, straight, moderately open grain with occasional way figuring. Can have strong contrast in grain in plainsawn boards.

Ash Charactermark

Ash Charactermark

Heartwood is light tan to dark brown; sapwood is cream y white. Similar in appearance to white oak, but frequently more yellow. Grain: Bold, straight, moderately open grain with occasional way figuring. Can have strong contrast in grain in plainsawn boards. Variations Within Species and Grades: Sometimes confused with hickory; the zone of large pores is more distinctive in ash, similar to that of red oak.

Ash Rift & Quartered

Ash Rift & Quartered

Heartwood is light tan to dark brown; sapwood is cream y white. Similar in appearance to white oak, but frequently more yellow. Grain: Bold, straight, moderately open grain with occasional way figuring. Can have strong contrast in grain in plainsawn boards. Variations Within Species and Grades: Sometimes confused with hickory; the zone of large pores is more distinctive in ash, similar to that of red oak.

Ash Select & Better

Ash Select & Better

Heartwood is light tan to dark brown; sapwood is cream y white. Similar in appearance to white oak, but frequently more yellow. Grain: Bold, straight, moderately open grain with occasional way figuring. Can have strong contrast in grain in plainsawn boards.

Birch Select & Better

Birch Select & Better

Heartwood is mostly reddish brown; sapwood is generally pale white. Grain: Mostly closed, straight grain; fine, uniform texture. Coarser than European beech. Variations within Grain and Species: Only one species is native to the United States.

Hickory Common

Hickory Common

Hickory heartwood is tan or reddish; sapwood is white to cream, with fine brown lines. Grain: Hickory is closed, with moderate definition; somewhat rough textured. Variations Within Species and Grain: In hickory, there is often pronounced differentiations in color between spring wood and summer wood.

Hickory Charactermark

Hickory Charactermark

Hickory heartwood is tan or reddish; sapwood is white to cream, with fine brown lines. Grain: Hickory is closed, with moderate definition; somewhat rough textured. Variations Within Species and Grain: In hickory, there is often pronounced differentiations in color between spring wood and summer wood.

Hickory Select & Better

Hickory Select & Better

Hickory heartwood is tan or reddish; sapwood is white to cream, with fine brown lines. Grain: Hickory is closed, with moderate definition; somewhat rough textured. Variations Within Species and Grain: In hickory, there is often pronounced differentiations in color between spring wood and summer wood.

Maple 1st Grade

Maple 1st Grade

Heartwood is creamy white to light reddish brown; sapwood is pale to creamy white. Grain: Closed, subdued grain, with medium figuring and uniform texture. Occasionally shows quilted, fiddleback, curly or bird’s eye figuring. Figured boards often culled at grading and sold at a premium. Variations Within Species and Grades: Black maple is also hard; other species are classified as soft.

Maple 2nd Grade

Maple 2nd Grade

Heartwood is creamy white to light reddish brown; sapwood is pale to creamy white. Grain: Closed, subdued grain, with medium figuring and uniform texture. Occasionally shows quilted, fiddleback, curly or bird’s eye figuring. Figured boards often culled at grading and sold at a premium. Variations Within Species and Grades: Black maple is also hard; other species are classified as soft.

Maple 3rd Grade

Maple 3rd Grade

Heartwood is creamy white to light reddish brown; sapwood is pale to creamy white. Grain: Closed, subdued grain, with medium figuring and uniform texture. Occasionally shows quilted, fiddleback, curly or bird’s eye figuring. Figured boards often culled at grading and sold at a premium. Variations Within Species and Grades: Black maple is also hard; other species are classified as soft.

Maple Charactermark

Maple Charactermark

Heartwood is creamy white to light reddish brown; sapwood is pale to creamy white. Grain: Closed, subdued grain, with medium figuring and uniform texture. Occasionally shows quilted, fiddleback, curly or bird’s eye figuring. Figured boards often culled at grading and sold at a premium. Variations Within Species and Grades: Black maple is also hard; other species are classified as soft.

Maple Rift & Quartered

Maple Rift & Quartered

Heartwood is creamy white to light reddish brown; sapwood is pale to creamy white. Grain: Closed, subdued grain, with medium figuring and uniform texture. Occasionally shows quilted, fiddleback, curly or bird’s eye figuring. Figured boards often culled at grading and sold at a premium. Variations Within Species and Grades: Black maple is also hard; other species are classified as soft.

Oak Select & Better

Oak Select & Better

Heartwood and sapwood are similar, with sapwood lighter in color; most pieces have a reddish tone. Slightly redder than white oak. Grain: Open, slightly coarser (more porous) than white oak. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or butterflies.

Red Maple

Red Maple

Heartwood is creamy white to light reddish brown; sapwood is pale to creamy white. Grain: Closed, subdued grain, with medium figuring and uniform texture. Occasionally shows quilted, fiddleback, curly or bird’s eye figuring. Figured boards often culled at grading and sold at a premium.

Red Birch Common

Red Birch Common

In yellow birch, sapwood is creamy yellow pale while heartwood is light reddish brown tinged with red. Grain: Medium figuring, straight, closed grain, even texture. Occasional curly grain or wavy figure in some boards. Variations Within Species and Grades: Yellow and red birch are most commonly used for flooring. Boards can vary greatly in grain and color in common grades.

Red Oak Charactermark

Red Oak Charactermark

Heartwood and sapwood are similar, with sapwood lighter in color; most pieces have a reddish tone. Slightly redder than white oak. Grain: Open, slightly coarser (more porous) than white oak. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or butterflies. Variations Within Species and Grades: More than 200 species in North America; great variation in color and grain.

Red Oak Common

Red Oak Common

Heartwood and sapwood are similar, with sapwood lighter in color; most pieces have a reddish tone. Slightly redder than white oak. Grain: Open, slightly coarser (more porous) than white oak. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or butterflies. Variations Within Species and Grades: More than 200 species in North America.

Red Oak Common

Red Oak Common

Heartwood and sapwood are similar, with sapwood lighter in color; most pieces have a reddish tone. Slightly redder than white oak. Grain: Open, slightly coarser (more porous) than white oak. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or butterflies. Variations Within Species and Grades: More than 200 species in North America.

Red Oak Rift & Quartered

Red Oak Rift & Quartered

Heartwood and sapwood are similar, with sapwood lighter in color; most pieces have a reddish tone. Slightly redder than white oak. Grain: Open, slightly coarser (more porous) than white oak. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or butterflies. Variations Within Species and Grades: More than 200 species in North America; great variation in color and grain.

Red Oak Select & Better

Red Oak Select & Better

Heartwood and sapwood are similar, with sapwood lighter in color; most pieces have a reddish tone. Slightly redder than white oak. Grain: Open, slightly coarser (more porous) than white oak. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or butterflies. Variations Within Species and Grades: More than 200 species in North America.

Red Oak Select & Better

Red Oak Select & Better

Heartwood and sapwood are similar, with sapwood lighter in color; most pieces have a reddish tone. Slightly redder than white oak. Grain: Open, slightly coarser (more porous) than white oak. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or butterflies.

Walnut Charactermark

Walnut Charactermark

Heartwood ranges from a deep, rich dark brown to a purplish black. Sapwood is nearly white to tan. Difference between heartwood and sapwood color is great; some flooring manufacturers steam lumber to bleed the darker heartwood color into the sapwood, resulting in a more consistent color. Grain: Mostly straight and open, but some boards have burled or swirly grain. Variations Within Species and Grain: Great variety of color and figure within species, as well as variations in color among boards.

Walnut Rift & Quartered

Walnut Rift & Quartered

Heartwood ranges from a deep, rich dark brown to a purplish black. Sapwood is nearly white to tan. Difference between heartwood and sapwood color is great; some flooring manufacturers steam lumber to bleed the darker heartwood color into the sapwood, resulting in a more consistent color. Grain: Mostly straight and open, but some boards have burled or swirly grain. Variations Within Species and Grain: Great variety of color and figure within species, as well as variations in color among boards.

Walnut Select

Walnut Select

Heartwood ranges from a deep, rich dark brown to a purplish black. Sapwood is nearly white to tan. Difference between heartwood and sapwood color is great; some flooring manufacturers steam lumber to bleed the darker heartwood color into the sapwood, resulting in a more consistent color. Grain: Mostly straight and open, but some boards have burled or swirly grain. Variations Within Species and Grain: Great variety of color and figure within species, as well as variations in color among boards.

White Maple Premium

White Maple Premium

Heartwood is creamy white to light reddish brown; sapwood is pale to creamy white. Grain: Closed, subdued grain, with medium figuring and uniform texture. Occasionally shows quilted, fiddleback, curly or bird’s eye figuring. Figured boards often culled at grading and sold at a premium. Variations Within Species and Grades: Black maple is also hard; other species are classified as soft.

White Oak Charactermark

White Oak Charactermark

Appearance Color: Heartwood is light brown; some boards may have a pinkish tint or a slight grayish cast. Sapwood is white to cream. Grain: Open, with longer rays than red oak. Occasional crotches, swirls and burls. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or butterflies. Variations Within Species and Grades: Considerable variations among boards in color and grain.

White Oak Rift & Quartered

White Oak Rift & Quartered

Heartwood is light brown; some boards may have a pinkish tint or a slight grayish cast. Sapwood is white to cream. Grain: Open, with longer rays than red oak. Occasional crotches, swirls and burls. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or butterflies. Variations Within Species and Grades: Considerable variations among boards in color and grain

White Oak Select

White Oak Select

Heartwood is light brown; some boards may have a pinkish tint or a slight grayish cast. Sapwood is white to cream. Grain: Open, with longer rays than red oak. Occasional crotches, swirls and burls. Plainsawn boards have a plumed or flared grain appearance; riftsawn has a tighter grain pattern, low figuring; quartersawn has a flake pattern, sometimes called tiger rays or butterflies. Considerable variations among boards in color and grain.

Yellow Birch Common

Yellow Birch Common

In yellow birch, sapwood is creamy yellow pale while heartwood is light reddish brown tinged with red. Grain: Medium figuring, straight, closed grain, even texture. Occasional curly grain or wavy figure in some boards. Variations Within Species and Grades: Yellow and red birch are most commonly used for flooring. Boards can vary greatly in grain and color in common grades.

Yellow Birch Select & Better

Yellow Birch Select & Better

In yellow birch, sapwood is creamy yellow pale while heartwood is light reddish brown tinged with red. Grain: Medium figuring, straight, closed grain, even texture. Occasional curly grain or wavy figure in some boards. Variations Within Species and Grades: Yellow and red birch are most commonly used for flooring. Boards can vary greatly in grain and color in common grades.

323 Arthur Street, Tomah, WI 54660

Tel: 608-374-2018

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10:00am - 7:00pm
Saturday:

10:00am - 3:00pm

© 2020 K & B FLOORING  |  323 Arthur St, Tomah, WI 54660  |  608-374-2018  |  kandbflooring@hotmail.com

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